The Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonic and Quantum Technologies

Dodd-Walls Centre

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730 Cumberland Street
Dunedin, - 9016
NEW ZEALAND
0064-3-479-7973
0064-3-479-0964 (fax)

http://www.doddwalls.ac.nz

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General Information

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Research Specialties and Staff

Research Specialties and Staff

The Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonic and Quantum Technologies

Specialties for Degree Program

Research specialty Degree type
PhD
(Theoretical/Experimental)
Master's
(Final degree/Enroute to PhD)
Acoustics Experimental -
Applied Mathematics Theoretical -
Applied Physics Both -
Atomic, Molecular, & Optical Physics Both -
Biophysics Both -
Chemical Physics Experimental -
Climate/Atmospheric Science Theoretical -
Computational Physics Theoretical -
Computer Science Both -
Condensed Matter Physics Both -
Electrical Engineering Experimental -
Electromagnetism Both -
Energy Sources & Environment Both -
Engineering Physics/Science Experimental -
Geophysics Experimental -
Low Temperature Physics Both -
Materials Science, Metallurgy Experimental -
Medical, Health Physics Experimental -
Nano Science and Technology Both -
Nonlinear Dynamics and Complex Systems Both -
Optics Both -
Physics of Beams Experimental -
Polymer Physics/Science Experimental -
Quantum Foundations Both -
Solid State Physics Both -
Statistical & Thermal Physics Theoretical -
Systems Science/Engineering Experimental -
Theoretical Physics Theoretical -

Departmental Research and Staff

THEORETICAL

Quantum Fluids and Gases

The Centre has a strong tradition of fundamental studies of ultra-cold quantum gases, including cold, controlled collisions and cold quantum chemistry. Quantum fluids may be configured to emulate the physics of other less accessible quantum systems, and can then be engineered to simulate the key properties of the less controllable quantum systems, facilitating the direct investigation of condensed matter and many-body phenomena whose fundamental understanding remains obscure. Cold gases also provide a path to precision measurement, through applications of matter wave interferometry, which provides linkage to the sensor theme under Photonic Technologies. http://www.doddwalls.ac.nz/wa.asp?idWebPage=38247&idDetails=186
Joshua Bodyfelt, Ashton Bradley, Joachim Brand, Vladimir Bubanja, Howard Carmichael, Oleksandr Fialko, Sergej Flach, Maarten Hoogerland, David Hutchinson, Andrew Parkins, Ulrich Zuelicke

Quantum Manipulation and Information

As electronic and optical devices shrink, some form of individual quantum system manipulation is the inevitable technology of the future. We now have the ability to manipulate, not only atoms, but also artificial atoms (quantum dots and superconducting qubits) and micro and nanomechanical oscillators, all of it with light. We can in principle synthesize simple molecules, and control on this level is used to create qubits – the quantum mechanical analogue of the ubiquitous computer “bit”. Narrow linewidth interrogation of single rare earth ion dopants is another example of individual quantum system manipulation that can be applied to quantum information processing. This links to Acousto-Optical Tomography under Sensing and Imaging. http://www.doddwalls.ac.nz/wa.asp?idWebPage=38247&idDetails=187
Michael Albert, Mikkel Andersen, Howard Carmichael, Peter Derrick, Maarten Hoogerland, David Hutchinson, Jevon Longdell, Andrew Parkins

EXPERIMENTAL

Photonic Sensors and Imaging

Our increasing ability to control the coherence properties of light and matter allows the development of novel sensors and imaging techniques that exceed current state-of-the-art. This includes the development of medical imaging techniques at the forefront of advanced tissue diagnostics such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), based on coherence properties of light, Acousto-Optic Tomography, based upon quantum memory techniques (linked to the Quantum Technologies theme), fluorescence, mass spectroscopy and many other sensing techniques. http://www.doddwalls.ac.nz/wa.asp?idWebPage=38247&idDetails=182
Justin Hodgkiss, Rainer Künnemeyer, Jari Kaipio, Eric Le Ru, Rainer Leonhardt, Jevon Longdell, Brendan McCane, Roger Reeves, Michael Reid, Harald Schwefel, Kasper Van Wijk, Frederique Vanholsbeeck, Jon Paul Wells, Peter Xu

Photonic Sources and Components

Projects in the fields of laser sources and optical componentry include the development of new quantum-well laser diode sources for use in prototype OCT systems and of new mode-locked fibre lasers designed to operate at currently unavailable wavelengths. Such sources are of scientific interest, commercial value, and, importantly, will feed into the development of new sensors with potential applications in telecommunications, precision measurement and information processing. http://www.doddwalls.ac.nz/wa.asp?idWebPage=38247&idDetails=183
Neil Broderick, Stephane Coen, Miro Erkintalo, Sergej Flach, Jianyong Jin, Bernd Krauskopf, Rainer Leonhardt, Stuart Murdoch, Geoff Waterhouse

Quantum Fluids and Gases

The Centre has a strong tradition of fundamental studies of ultra-cold quantum gases, including cold, controlled collisions and cold quantum chemistry. Quantum fluids may be configured to emulate the physics of other less accessible quantum systems, and can then be engineered to simulate the key properties of the less controllable quantum systems, facilitating the direct investigation of condensed matter and many-body phenomena whose fundamental understanding remains obscure. Cold gases also provide a path to precision measurement, through applications of matter wave interferometry, which provides linkage to the sensor theme under Photonic Technologies. http://www.doddwalls.ac.nz/wa.asp?idWebPage=38247&idDetails=186
Joshua Bodyfelt, Ashton Bradley, Joachim Brand, Howard Carmichael, Sergej Flach, Maarten Hoogerland, David Hutchinson, Rainer Künnemeyer, Andrew Parkins, Michael Reid, Ulrich Zuelicke

Quantum Manipulation and Information

As electronic and optical devices shrink, some form of individual quantum system manipulation is the inevitable technology of the future. We now have the ability to manipulate, not only atoms, but also artificial atoms (quantum dots and superconducting qubits) and micro and nanomechanical oscillators, all of it with light. We can in principle synthesize simple molecules, and control on this level is used to create qubits – the quantum mechanical analogue of the ubiquitous computer “bit”. Narrow linewidth interrogation of single rare earth ion dopants is another example of individual quantum system manipulation that can be applied to quantum information processing. This links to Acousto-Optical Tomography under Sensing and Imaging. http://www.doddwalls.ac.nz/wa.asp?idWebPage=38247&idDetails=187
Michael Albert, Mikkel Andersen, Howard Carmichael, Peter Derrick, Maarten Hoogerland, David Hutchinson, Jevon Longdell, Andrew Parkins, Harald Schwefel

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